Free teacher training day at Lincoln Cathedral on local heritage

We are preparing to host a free teacher training session to help teachers and school children develop an understanding of their local heritage and its significance.

The training day, which takes place on 1 February from 2pm-5pm at 27 Minister Yard, a property to the left of the Cathedral’s main entrance, will be facilitated by Historic England, and will offer a practical, hands-on session looking at how historic maps and aerial photographs of Lincoln can provide a starting point for local study in schools. A teacher training session held by Historic England

Teachers will have the opportunity to find out more about the exciting Connected project and how they can get involved on the day too.

At the training day, Historic England will show teachers how to trace changes over time, develop chronological understanding and will provide a step by step guide on how to carry out a local history study using census data and free websites, with the aim of giving children a sense of pride in where they live.

There will also be an opportunity to find out more about the exciting future for school visits at Lincoln Cathedral once the new learning centre is developed.

This day will give teachers the chance to link Lincoln’s history with their curriculum to inspire real and relevant learning experiences for their students. It’s brilliant to be able to share more stories of the Cathedral with teachers, which in turn will be passed on to students, hopefully sparking further interest in this magnificent building.

Places are limited and we’ve already had a number of bookings, so we would encourage people to reserve their place by contacting Lincoln Cathedral or Historic England.

The event is fully funded by the Heritage Schools Programme and is free to teachers and students from all Lincolnshire school. In addition, state schools can claim a contribution of £75 towards the cost of cover for one teacher.

To register your interest please email kate.argyle@HistoricEngland.org.uk or education@lincolncathedral.com

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Charter of the Forest inspired exhibition hosted by Lincoln Cathedral

Giles Exhibition

Lincoln Cathedral recently hosted an art exhibition by Giles Academy, inspired by the 800th anniversary of Charter of the Forest 1217.

The exhibition, which ends on Thursday 16th November, includes fine art paintings, ceramics, mixed media sculptures and architectural model making together with photography and graphic design, created by year 7 to year 13 students from Giles Academy.

Giles Academy is a large secondary specialist visual arts school in the small village of Old Leake near Boston, Lincolnshire.

On Tuesday 14th November year 8 Bronze Arts Award students from Giles Academy lead a Matisse inspired art workshop ‘Forest Pathways’ for a local primary school in the Chapter House.  This collaborative work was enjoyed by all and the art will be on display at the school until the end of term.

The exhibition has been very well received by the public and has encouraged new audiences to visit the Cathedral.

Unknown details of the Cathedral’s past revealed as 18th century documents are unearthed

Our team has unearthed historic documents that date back to the 18th and 19th centuries which have revealed unknown details about the Cathedral.

Pearson's letters regarding the Cathedral architecture

The documents, which include details of who lived in the Cathedral Close at the time and insightful information on the wishes of the Cathedral’s architect, give a glimpse into the past which have been captured in the pages of archival material.

Over the last 12 months, we commissioned a palaeography group to study historical leases and documents relating to the Close dating back to as early as 1851 and through this research these documents have been found.

One document, the 1851 Census, states that over 140 tenants once resided in the Close, which is the area immediately around the Cathedral and includes Castle Square, James Street and others.

In the census, details can be found on the properties and the residents who lived in the Close over 166 years ago. Residents included butchers, paupers, clergy staff, physicians, a distributer of stamps and a portrait artist. It is fascinating to hear about the range of people who once lived here and to learn more about the lifestyle they lead throughout the 18th and 19th century.

Part of the magic of the Cathedral is that there is still much we don’t know about it and when we have the opportunity to unlock some of the mystery and to add to Lincoln’s vibrant and rich heritage it’s incredibly exciting and important.

Amongst the Close documents, the Connected project also revealed letters dating from 1881 to 1894 written by the Cathedral architect at the time J.L Pearson. Mr Pearson had documented the current repair works to the Cathedral as well as some plans that were never completed, which could have dramatically changed the way we see Lincoln Cathedral today if they had been.

These letters demonstrate that the history of Lincoln Cathedral is not just the history of what is but what could have been, and allow us to hear the voices of the people directly involved in the creation and image of the Cathedral as we see it today.